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tutorial

plastic spoon reindeer

by @according2kelly on December 22, 2009

who knew plastic spoons could provide soooo much entertainment value?
check out the easy-breezy tutorial HERE.

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plastic spoon turkeys

by @according2kelly on November 25, 2009

just in time for turkey day… a super easy craft for you & the kiddos.
& you won’t even have to rush out to the craft store. more than
likely, you have all the supplies on hand. & if you don’t, just improvise.
ready to make your own plastic spoon turkeys? just click the whrrl
story below. soon you’ll have turkeys gobble gobbling all over the place.

Powered by Whrrl

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D.I.Y. boutique wipes case tutorial

by @according2kelly on June 9, 2009

lately, my crafting time is either very limited or totally non-existant… which makes sewing anything completely out of the question. but giving up crafting cold turkey is definitely not an option. so, i’ve had to to devise some crafts that i can do standing up, holding a baby, in a very short time period. luckily, you can never have too many fancy-nancy boutique style wipes case – especially if you don’t have to pay the fancy-nancy boutique style prices…

D.I.Y. boutique wipes case tutorial
supplies needed: one travel wipes case, some batting, a fabric scrap, mod podge & sponge brush, trim and hot glue.
time needed: 1/2 hour
crafting expertise: beginner… if you can wield a glue gun, you’re good to go.

click on pictures to enlarge















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making soap

by @according2kelly on February 4, 2009

because you asked, here it is, a simple tutorial on making soap. & trust me, it really is simple! the first step is to gather your supplies (you should be able to pick them all up at your local craft store): a white or clear glycerin soap brick (of course, how many soaps you make depends on how large your cookie cutters are, etc. but i found one brick makes quite a few little soapies), soap dye or food coloring, soap fragrance (optional, but it’s a nice touch), soap glitter (optional, it just gives that extra little bling! bling!), cookie cutters (i used lots of different sized heart shapes), a spray bottle filled with rubbing alcohol, & a non-stick pan (any size works, it just depends on how much you want to make of a particular color. i used both a 9×9″ and 9×13″). now we’re ready…


1. cut the glycerin bar into smaller pieces & then, using a double-boiler, or a make-shift double-boiler like i do, heat until melted. meanwhile, you’ll want to determine how much glycerin you are going to need. the best way to do this is to fill your nonstick pan with water, so that it hits just below the height of your cookie cutter. you can then either measure that amount of water using a measuring cup & use the same amount of melted glycerin, or mark the height of the water on the pan (personally, i think this is the easiest). does that make sense? you just don’t want your finished, hardened soap to be taller than the cookie cutters, it’ll make cutting out your soaps a bit harder.


2. with the glycerin completely melted, it’s time to add the soap dye, fragrance & glitter. follow the instructions on each of the packages, & go slowly… adding just a little bit at a time. trust me, a little can go a long way.


3. when you’re pleased with the color & smell (that sounds funny) pour the liquid into your chosen pan (& remember, don’t go above your “indicator”). although if you are going the measuring cup route, you’ll want to determine how much you need with the measuring cup, & then pour it into the pan, blah blah blah. at this point you have two choices… you can either let your soap harden on your counter (& i have no idea how long that would take), or, if you are as impatient as i am, you’ll put it in the freezer for about 10 minutes. whatever you decide, you’ll want to spray the top with the rubbling alcohol to eliminate any bubbles that have formed. & don’t worry, if you have extra glycerin left over, just use it in the next batch…


4. once your soap has hardened, turn it out, upside down on a cutting board or wax paper (you might want to use a butter knife to loosen it around the edges). & then, go crazy with your chosen cookie cutters. & when you are done, you too will be able to “spread the love… one hand wash at a time”.

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i spy bottles

by @according2kelly on January 19, 2009

I_Spy_Bottle_how_to

the boys & i had so much fun making these “i spy bottles” for our friends over the holiday season, & the best part? unlike the i spy bags, there is absolutely NO sewing involved.

easy-peasy i spy bottles

prep: 1 large plastic bottle (i used the 33.8 FL OZ smart water bottle), a mr. clean magic eraser, goo gone, approximately 30+ small doo-dads & findings to fill bottle (peruse craft stores, etc. for “little” stuff. buttons, scrapbook stuff, household odds & ends. for ex: paper clip, button, penny), poly-pellets (you can find this at craft stores, it’s usually used for doll stuffing) or you can also use bird seed or rice as the filler, funnel, super glue, clear contact paper or packing tape & confetti (although this is totally optional, it just makes it look pretty… alphabet & number confetti works really well, & adds a fun component – find all the letters of the alphabet, etc.).i_spy_bottle_tutorial

for a step-by-step picture tutorial, simply click on the pictures at the right to enlarge…

1. start with a clean & dry bottle
2. using the Magic Eraser remove any black printing on the bottle
3. remove the label from the bottle & use the goo gone to remove any of the residual stickiness.
4. fill your bottle with all you “goodies”, don’t forget to make a list of what you put in!
5. using the funnel, fill the bottle about 2/3 full with your filler (the poly-pellets, rice, or bird seed). you want it full, but not so full that when you shake it, your items don’t move around.
6. if you are adding confetti, you’ll want to do so at this time.
7. at this point you’ll want to screw on the bottle cap & shake, shake, shake! (i tend to start singing shake senora at this point.) mix everything up really well… plus it works well as a trial run. if the “goodies” aren’t moving around, you may have to take out some of your filler.
8. once everything is shaken up & you’re pleased with the amount of filler, etc. it’s time to super glue on your bottle cap – you definitely don’t want little hands & fingers getting it unscrewed! & don’t forget to cut off that little “extra” part of the cap that is floating around now… you know the part that you “unscrew” the bottle cap from, when you first open the bottle.
9. print up your list “can you spy a…” with all of your goodies listed. tape or glue it to the bottle & cover it with clear contact paper or packing tape, so it doesn’t get lost. (you can also laminate the list & tie it to the bottle, if that works better for you.)
10. at this point you can be done, or you can add some colorful curling ribbon to make it pretty.

ta da! your very own i spy bottle. now it’s time for the fun to begin. i spy a…

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mod podged frames

by @according2kelly on December 10, 2008

mod podge frame tutorialyou’ve asked, so i’m delivering…. once again, here are the instructions for mod podging your very own picture frames.

supplies needed:
an unfinished frame (the dollar specials are always great), wood stain, a piece of card stock scrapbook paper (larger than your frame), a jar of mod podge, a sponge brush applicator, a tiny bit of sand paper, a razor blade or exacto knife, & a tim holtz distress ink stamp pad (my favorite is the tea dye, & you can pick it up at your local craft store in the “stamping” section).

directions:
1. stain your frame. you don’t have to stain the entire frame, just the areas that will be visible after you mod podge the paper to the front… that means you will be staining the back of the frame, the outer sides of the frame as well as the inner sides (near where the picture will go) & don’t forget to stain the dowel that you will be using as the stand.mod podge frame tutorial

2. once your frame is dry, it’s time to get your mod podge on… the first step to the art of mod podging is to apply a light layer over the entire surface to be mod podged (the front of the frame) & let it dry for about 30 seconds or so. the timing isn’t setting in stone, you just want it to set-up a touch.mod podge frame tutorial

3. next, you apply another layer of mod podge & then position your chosen card stock on top of the frame (pay careful attention to any particular areas that you don’t want to cut away & steer those parts away from the center or edges of your frame).mod podge frame tutorial

4. press the paper firmly to the frame, smoothing away any air bubbles that may form. (it’s kinda like wall papering… i found it helpful to use an old credit card to help smooth the paper out.)mod podge frame tutorial

5. once the paper is set in place, let it sit for about 5 minutes, then recheck your frame to see if any more bubbles have appeared. if there are, press the bubble down again. if it still doesn’t stick, take a straight pin to release the air under the paper & press it smooth.

6. once your frame is dry, put it right-side down on a cutting surface & using your razor blade or exacto knife, trim off the extra paper from around the edges & from the center opening of the frame. & don’t worry, it doesn’t have to be perfect, you are going to be sanding it later.mod podge frame tutorial

7. using your sand paper, sand all of the paper edges (that you just trimmed) to ensure that they are smooth.mod podge frame tutorial

now here comes the super-secret, super-easy, but super-fantastic step…mod podge frame tutorial

8. THIS little stamp pad rocks! it’s the magic, that makes everything look beautiful. using your stamp pad, go over all your newly sanded edges… your going to be “covering up” the bright white of those newly cut paper edges. make sense? you can also use a sponge, or paper towel to pick up ink & get into those “hard-to-reach” places. you can use the stamp pad as much or as little as you like to create a more vintage look. sometimes i just use it on the edges, sometimes i’ll use it to completely cover the entire scrapbook paper. you can also use a little water to spread and smudge the ink… experiment with it.mod podge frame tutorial

9. once your paper trimming, sanding & ink-applying is done, apply at least 3 more layers of mod podge on top of the scrapbook paper. apply a layer of mod podge & let it dry for about 15 minutes, then apply another, and let it dry, etc. (sometimes, i’ve even applied more of the vintage-y ink in-between layers of mod podge, i told you, i love the stuff!). mod podge frame tutorial

10. when everything is good & dry, at this point you are pretty much done… so pat yourself on the back, find the perfect picture, & ta da! you have a finished product.mod podge frame tutorial

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paper pumpkins

by @according2kelly on October 8, 2008

over the past couple of days ghosts, witches, a few pirates & lots of pumpkins have taken over the house. last year we had so much making these paper pumpkins, that we decided to do them again. you & your kiddos want to make a some too? grab some paper, a paper punch, some floral wire, & a few fake leaves and you’ll be making pumpkins in no time. (click on the pictures on the right to enlarge them.)

1. start with a piece of paper. i prefer card stock, but really, any paper will do. & the size really isn’t important. different sizes of paper will create different sized pumpkins, so have fun with it & be creative.
2. cut your paper into strips. i usually make the strips 1″ wide, but again, be creative. experiment with different widths, or even a mixture. there is no right or wrong way to do this.
3. after you’ve cut your strips punch a hole in each end of your strip, resulting in two holes per strip, one at each end.
4. stack all the strips on top of each other, line up the holes, & thread a piece of floral wire (about 5″ long) through all of the holes. make sure to kink or coil one of the ends of the floral wire to “anchor” it.
5. after you’ve threaded the floral wire through one set of the holes, fold the paper in a u-shape & thread the wire through the other set of stacked holes. make sense? when you’ve done it correctly the paper will make a tear drop shape.
6. now, kink or coil this end of the floral wire, once again “anchoring” it. how much space or wire you leave between the two ends of paper is up to you. again experiment with the length of wire you leave. the more wire, the taller the pumpkin will sit. just play with the shape.
7. using some excess floral wire attach a couple of leaves, fan out your pumpkin, & ta da! you are all finished.

this is a quick & easy project, & my kids love to help. they get a kick out of punching holes & helping “thread” the pumpkins. try different colors & paper textures… it’s fun seeing what you can create.

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happy everything.

by @according2kelly on September 11, 2008


who says you can’t celebrate the “every day”? gather your supplies, break out the sewing machine & let’s make some “happy everything” banners. they are super easy & pretty quick… you’ll be done in no time at all.

supplies needed:
* somewhere between 4 & 24 different fat quarters, depending on how many “different” fabrics you want in your banner (you can get about 6 double-sided flags from one fat quarter, and each banner has about 24 (or 18) double-sided flags total, depending on the length of your bias tape)
* bias tape (which style you use, is totally up to you… i’ve used both single fold bias tape & double fold bias tape… personally, i prefer the double fold, simply because i think it’s easier, but, the single folds over into a really cute & tiny edge. i usually use whatever i have on hand. it should be noted that most bias tapes come 4 yards in length, however some are 3 yards. if you are using the yard variety you’ll have a total of 24 double-sided flags, however if you use the 3 yard variety you’ll end up with 18 double-sided flags)
* basic “other” sewing supplies… rotary cutter, cutting mat, ruler, sewing pins, pinking shears (although not totally necessary) & a sewing machine


fold your fat quarter in half so that it’s measurements are aprroximately 22″ x 9″. using your ruler, cut the fat quarter down so that it is is only 8 1/2″ inches tall… the new measurements (while still folded in half ) are approximately 22″ x 8.5″.


keeping the fabric folded in half (that way, with each cut you’ll actually be making 2 flags, instead of just one!) & making sure the end that you are going to start cutting on, is on a whole number (it’s just easier for me to count when there’s a whole number involved). use your ruler to cut the first side of your triangular shaped flag. (i find it easier to lay my ruler on the lower right hand corner, & angle it so, that at the top it is 3 inches to left of my starting point. make sense?)


for the second cut, start with your ruler at the top (the point that is now 3 inches in from the side) & angle it down, 3 more inches to the left of the center point. for example: if you look at this picture closely (if it’s not big enough, click on it it enlarge). notice how on the right hand side, the lowest corner starts on the 25″ mark… for the first cut, i layed my ruler starting at the 25″ mark on the bottom & angled the ruler up & to the left 3″, so that it ended on the 22″ mark on the top. for my second cut, my ruler started on the 22″ mark on the top, & then i angled the ruler down & out 3″ from this middle point, so the ruler crossed the lower edge at the 19″ mark.

when all is said & done, you’ll have all these pretty little triangle that measures 8 1/2″ tall, & 6″ wide. have i lost you yet?


after you’ve cut the first triangle, you start all over, simply angling your next cut 3″ inches up & to the left…. as you can see (in the picture), the triangles will alternate with the “points” being up on top, & then on the bottom. when you are all finished, you should be able to get approximately 6 (double-sided) flags from one fat quarter.

repeat this same “cutting” process for your remaining fat quarters. remember, you only need 24 double-sided flags (a total of 48 individual flags, hopefully that doesn’t confuse you), or 18 double-sided flags (36 individual) if you are using the 3 yard bias tape.


after all your flags are cut, sew two individual flags together (wrong-sides together, with a 1/2″ seam) so that you have 24 (or 18) double-sided flags. it’s not necessary to sew shorter straight side of the triangle (i’m sure there is some correct, mathematical term for this side, but i have no clue what it is), because that side will be enclosed in the bias tape.


now, this next step is totally optional, but… if you use pinking shears on the long sides of the trianlge (yet another technical term i don’t know), it gives the flags a very cute, finished-looking edge. (click on the picture to enjoy the cuteness.)


now it’s time to break out the bias tape. (don’t worry, we’re almost done!) so what you want to do is enclose the “shorter” edges of the triangles inside the bias tape. it’s much easier (although it takes a bit more time) if you pin the corners of each flag, inside the bias tape. as for spacing of the flags, that’s totally up to you, personally i like the flags butted up against each other, with little or no space in between.


baby, it’s time to sew! after everything has been pinned & you’ve made sure you’ve caught all those little triangle corners inside the bias tape, sew as close to the open edge of the binding as possible. (you may or may not have noticed that one side of the binding is slightly shorter than the other side. it’s easiest to sew the binding, if you sew with that slightly shorter side on top…. and then, ta da! you are all done. your very own “happy everything” banner.

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i spy with my own eye…

by @according2kelly on May 20, 2008

easy sew i spy bagsi’ve been collecting little doo-dads forever (paper clips, foam stickers, confetti), wanting to make “i spy” bags for the boys. (click on pictures to enlarge.) finally, this weekend, i actually got around to making them. they came together easily & were super quick to make. the best part… the boys love them. here are the directions, they might be wordy, but it’s just because i’m trying to explain everything the best i can. really they truly are easy. looking for an even easier way to get your little kiddos there own little “i spy” bag? you can buy them HERE, HERE & HERE.

prep:
2 fleece squares that are 7″ square
a 4″ square of clear vinyl (at least 4 mm or thicker)
1 inkjet fabric sheet (can be found at most craft stores, or you can make your own HERE)
poly-pellets (can also be found at craft sores… it’s usually used for doll stuffing)
aprox. 30+ small doo-dads to fill bag (peruse craft stores, etc. for “little” stuff. buttons, scrapbook stuff, household odds & ends. for ex: paper clip, button, penny.)

assembly (click on the pictures, to enlarge them for a pictorial how-to):
easy to make i spy bags1. on the wrong side of one piece of fleece, using a ruler, find the exact center of the square. using your ruler, measure out from the center & draw a line 1.5″ from the center on all sides of the square (make each line about 3″ inches long). then using scissors or a rotary cutter, carefully cut along the lines to make your “window”.
2. center the vinyl over the window, on the wrong side of the fleece. you might find it helpful to use a bit of tape to hold it in place. very carefully sew the vinyl to the fleece. *vinyl can sometimes stick to the sewing machine, so you might want to test it first. if you find it sticking, you can use a piece of tissue paper between the vinyl & whatever it’s sticking to & just tear it away when you are done.) i personally like to sew with the fabric side against the pressure foot, but do whatever works for you. be sure to double stitch to prevent anything from falling out! i do a straight stitch around the window, and then go over the straight stitch with a decorative zig zag stitch.
3. if you haven’t already, now would be a good time to gather all your little doo-dads, type up your “i spy” list in a word processing program like word. i like to type it in a 3×3″ square text box. then, print the list out onto the fabric paper. cut out your list, make sure to leave enough room around the list, so you can sew around the edges (i figured this one out the hard way.) place your “list” on the solid (back) fleece square, with the right side facing up. zig zag around the edges to prevent it from fraying (you can also dab a little “no fray” on it as well).
4. now that your front “window” square, and back “list” square are done, pin them together, wrong sides together, & carefully sew around the bag, making a sem of about 1/4″ – 1/2″. again, i like to double stitch – the first time around i did a straight stitch, & then i did a decorative zig zag stitch the second time around. *be sure to leave a small opening on one side of the bag that you can use to pour the contents in.
5. fill your bag with your doo-dads, then start pouring in the poly-pellets, a funnel is really useful here. i start with about a cup of poly-pellets & slowly add. personally i like the pellets to fill the bag, to the top edge of the window, but it’s all personal preference. you just don’t want to add so many pellets that it’s hard to manipulate the bag & objects.
6. when you are down filling, carefully shake everything to the bottom of the bag & carefully sew up your opening. & then, ta da! you are finished.

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have you checked your calender lately?

by @according2kelly on April 14, 2008

because mother’s day is fast approaching! may 11 is just around the corner. & while i’m sure you all have been dropping hints to your hubby’s about ordering something from my shop (wink, wink! nudge, nudge!) what do you have planned from your own mothers, mil, etc. etc.? although i’m sure they too would appreciate a nice piece of jewelry, i think it’s fun to give something your kiddos can help create. last week a couple of girls & i got together with our littles to create mother’s day frames, perfect for framing a sweet picture of the kids. the frames turned out great, & my mom (who received hers as a birthday present) loved it (so she says). anyway, i thought i’d share the idea with all of you. (& to be honest, they’d really be great for any recipient, or holiday… father’s day, birthday’s, christmas, you get the idea.) what do i love about this idea? it’s totally personal, your kids can help, it’ super cheap, & really easy…. anyone can do it.

supplies needed:
an unfinished frame (we used the dollar specials we picked up at michael’s, but i’m sure any craft stores has the exact, if not similar frame), wood stain, a piece of plain colored card stock paper (larger than your frame), water colors/ crayons/ colored pencils… or what ever “medium” your little one prefers, a jar of mod podge, a sponge brush aplicator, a tiny bit of sand paper & a razor blade or exacto knife.

directions:
1. assemble all of your supplies & set up your “work space”. mod podge, water colors, wood stain… this could definitely get messy.
2. stain your frame. you don’t have to stain the entire frame, just the areas that will be visible after you mod podge the paper to the front… that means you will be staining the back of the frame, the outer sides of the frame as well as the inner sides (near where the picture will go) & don’t forget to stain the dowel that you will be using as the stand.
3. while the stain is drying, get out the cardstock & let your little one go to town on it. encourage them to have fun & be colorful. our kiddos are just wee little ones, so we tried to push the finger painting. if you have older children, just make sure they realize that some of the paper is going to be cut away… you don’t want to cut away vital parts of their picture!
4. once the kids are finished with their masterpieces, if necessary, let it dry.
5. when the frame & artworks are dry, it’s time to get your mod podge on! (if your artwork has warped at all, as ours did, i’d suggest ironing it between layers of a dishtowel…)
6. the first step to the art of mod podging is to apply a light layer over the entire surface to be mod podged (the front of the frame) & let it dry for about 30 seconds or so. the timing isn’t setting in stone, you just want it to set-up a touch.
7. next, you apply another layer of mod podge & then position your child’s artwork on top of the frame (pay careful attention to any particular areas that you don’t want to cut away & steer those parts away from the center or edges of your frame).
8. press the paper firmly to the frame, smoothing away any air bubbles that may form. (it’s kinda like wall papering… i found it helpful to use an old credit card to help smooth the paper out.)
9. once the paper is set in place, let it sit for about 5 minutes, then recheck your frame to see if any more bubbles have appeared. if there are, press the bubble down again. if it still doesn’t stick, take a straight pin to release the air under the paper & press it smooth.
10. once your frame is dry, put it right-side down on a cutting surface & using your razor blade or exacto knife, trim off the extra paper from around the edges & from the center opening of the frame.
11. using your sand paper, sand all of the paper edges (that you just trimmed) to ensure that they are smooth.
12. once your paper trimming & sanding is all done, apply at least 2 more layers of mod podge on top of the artwork.
13. when everything is good & dry, at this point you are pretty much done & your frame is ready for a cute picture of your little one(s). however, if you so choose, using a paper towel or cloth & just a touch of stain, you can “vintage-ize” your frame by rubbing just a bit of stain on the exposed edges of your paper. but, like i said, this step is totally up to you & not at all necessary to create your incredibly personalized frame, that i’m sure it’s recipient will love & be thrilled to receive.

click on the pictures for a step-by-step pictorial, & if you have any questions, just leave me a comment or shoot me an email!

have fun!

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